Taliban death squads 'dragging people from homes & executing them' in fresh hunt for interpreters who helped US & UK

TALIBAN death squads are reportedly pulling people from their homes and executing them as they step up the hunt for anyone who helped the US and UK.

Translators and other support staff are living in fear with many attempting to desperately flee Afghanistan after the extremist militia seized power in Kabul.


Taliban forces are now cementing their ruleas the West continues to desperately attempt to evacuate their citizens and thousands of Afghans who want to escape the ruthless regime.

Pictures show a chilling show of strength by the Taliban as fighters in white robes and masks along with black boots and body army as they cradle assault rifles – many of which appear to be US-made M16s.

Footage showed the fighters marching through Qalat waving the distinctive white flag of the Taliban as their reign of terror begins.

And in a chilling warning, a leaked United Nations document said that the Taliban are intensifying their search for anyone who worked with the US or NATO.

The report — provided by the UN's threat-assessment consultants and seen by AFP — says the group has "priority lists" of individuals it wants to hunt down.

Prime targets include those who had central roles in the Afghan military, police and intelligence services – with the Taliban conducting "door-to-door visits" across Afghanistan.

Family members of those on the list are also at risk – with reports of one relative of a DW journalistalready being shot and killed by the Taliban.

Militants are also blockading Kabul airport and set up checkpoints in major cities to try and catch anyone they want to arrest and potentially execute them.

Taliban officials had insisted they were offering an amnesty to any "collaborators" – but this appears to have just been a claim for good PR.

Executions, torture and amputations were commonplace when the militant group last ruled Afghanistan in the 90s – before they were ousted by the US and UK after the invasion in 2001.

People are being dragged from their houses and executed. It is a truly horrific situation.

Australian organization Forsaken Fighters – who works with Afghan interpreters -also told The Sun Online they believe "tens of thousands" of people are now at risk.

The group says they have received hundreds of pleas for help – with reports of translators having their homes burned down as they say "we are dying over and over again".

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"Interpreters on the ground in Kandahar have reported that the Taliban have been actively seeking out interpreters who supported coalition forces, even using local kids to help in pouting out people and going door to door to find them," a spokesman said.

They added they had already received reports of "very public" reprisals and executions against those who worked with the West.

He added: "People are being dragged from their houses and executed. It is a truly horrific situation.

"The sheer desperation of those people that assisted us is overwhelming."



The UN document, dated Wednesday, was written by the Norwegian Center for Global Analyses, an organization that provides intelligence to the body's agencies.

"They are targeting the families of those who refuse to give themselves up, and prosecuting and punishing their families 'according to Sharia law,'" Christian Nellemann, the group's executive director, said.

"We expect both individuals previously working with NATO/US forces and their allies, alongside with their family members to be exposed to torture and executions.

"This will further jeopardize western intelligence services, their networks, methods and ability to counter both the Taliban, ISIS and other terrorist threats ahead."

The report added the militants are "rapidly recruiting" informants to help weed out anyone they consider to be a threat to their potentially fragile new regime.

MPs have called on the government to do more to help Britain's allies who bravely served alongside our troops in Afghanistan.

Speaking in the Commons on Wednesday, Labour's Dan Jarvis said: "Many of us who served in Afghanistan have a deep bond of affection for the Afghan people, and I had the honour of serving alongside them in Helmand. We trained together, fought together, and in some cases we died together.

"They were our brothers in arms.

"But I shudder to think where those men are now, many will be dead, others I know now consider themselves to be dead men walking."

'DEAD MEN WALKING'

Resistance groups in the northern province of Panjshir are massing, with reports former Afghan commandos along with soldiers and other security services are preparing to mount a fightback.

Meanwhile, Britain could halt its Afghanistan rescue mission in just three days – potentially leaving thousands to the mercy of the Taliban.

Troops are n a race against time to evacuate up to 6,000 Brit nationals and Afghan locals as the UK urges President Joe Biden to delay the withdrawal of US forces from Kabul airport.

British paratroopers are desperately trying to manage to chaos at the airport amid fears the evacuation mission could collapse in days.

Ministers have reportedly been told the last British evacuation flight out of Taliban-controlled Kabul could be on Tuesday – but a final decision had not been taken.

UK Defence Minister James Heappey warned the airbridge could close in the coming days.

"The air bridge has two more days, five more days, ten days," he said.

"It keeps absolutely everyone here at the Ministry of Defence awake at night – that reality that we won’t get absolutely everyone out. 

"At the moment the large majority are getting to us. Now of course, some will not be able to get to us."


Prime Minister Boris Johnson said 2,000 people had been repatriated to the UK on both Thursday and Friday – with most of them UK nationals or those who had assisted British efforts in Afghanistan.

However, a senior government source told the Times: "People are going to get left behind. It's a question of how many.

"It could be thousands. I don't think people have realised the extent of the risk."

Biden defended the US withdrawal, saying he had "seen no questioning of our credibility from our allies around the world" after speaking with NATO partners.

But he admitted the US may not be able to rescue everyone it needs from the Taliban territory by the August 31 deadline.

He branded the evacuation as the “most difficult and dangerous airlift in history.

He added: "Make no mistake, this evacuation is dangerous.

"I cannot promise what the final outcome will be or that it will be without risk of loss."

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