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Pancake recipes that are good for your health reveals BDA

 

Yes, there IS such a thing as healthy pancakes: We reveal 7 scrummy recipes that are good for your hair and blood pressure

  • If pancakes are frequently on the menu, you may want ideas for healthy fillings
  • Ours include guilt-free chocolate spread to smoked salmon and cream cheese 
  • Sian Porter of the British Dietetic Association reveals seven healthy options

Are pancakes your once-a-year treat on Shrove Tuesday? If so, then indulge yourself, enjoy every mouthful and move on.

But if pancakes are more frequently on the menu, you may want ideas for healthier mixes and fillings.

The simplest pancake batter is made by whisking together one cup of flour, one cup of milk and one egg.

Aim for a DVD-sized pancake (after cooking), but not too thick. This will provide about 80 calories.

Using at least part wholemeal flour will boost the fibre: use buckwheat for a nice, nutty flavour and fibre boost.

Cook in a non-stick pan so you need less fat — and use an oil spray.

Unrefined sugars such as honey, syrup and nectar are still sugar, so watch your portions.

Instead, add mashed fruit to your pancake batter for sweetness or scatter fruit such as blueberries on the pancake batter in the pan.

You can do a similar thing with veg that wilts, such as spinach.Heat up the milk for your pancake batter, add the leaves, leave to cool and then whiz up with your other ingredients for a wonderful green batter.

Each topping is for one pancake only unless otherwise stated: nutritional values are for toppings only.

PEAR, WALNUT AND BLUE CHEESE

GOOD FOR: YOUR SKIN

INGREDIENTS (for two pancakes):

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION:

Using strong cheese means you can use less and crumbling it makes a little go further, meaning less saturated fat and fewer calories.

Blue cheese is lower in lactose (milk sugar) than other cheese as the ageing process naturally breaks lactose down, so a little can be digested by the lactose intolerant.

Wash and slice the pear, add the walnuts — an excellent source of plant-based omega 3 — and crumble on the blue cheese (about the size of your thumbs put together).

SMOKED SALMON AND CREME FRAICHE

GOOD FOR: YOUR GUT

INGREDIENTS (for six bite-size pancakes):

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION:

A classic healthy choice, with a good hit of omega 3.Official figures show the average adult aged 18 to 64 eats only 54g of oily fish, rich in omega 3, a week; the recommended minimum is 140g.

Wild salmon contains less fat and is lower in contaminants such as pesticides and industrial chemicals, but watch the salt content as some brands can be high.

Look for low-fat creme fraiche or sour cream that’s ‘bio’ or contains ‘live cultures’ as these will provide gut-friendly probiotics.

APPLE, RAISINS AND CINNAMON

GOOD FOR: YOUR NERVES

INGREDIENTS (for two pancakes):

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION:

Though dried fruit provides sugar, it is natural and also has fibre, vitamins and minerals (and 1 tbsp counts as one of your five a day).

Raisins are a good source of copper, important for your nervous system and moving iron around the body.

Core, peel and slice a couple of apples, put in a pan with a splash of water and cook on a low heat for 20 minutes or until tender.

Add raisins and a generous pinch of cinnamon. Take it off the heat, but leave to stew.

A 2012 review of studies suggested that cinnamon could have a potentially beneficial effect on blood sugar control.

GREEN TEA COMPOTE

GOOD FOR: LOWER CHOLESTEROL

INGREDIENTS (for two pancakes):

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION:

Rehydrating dried fruit can result in a delicious plump topping that’s rich in fibre. It’s best done overnight — fruit or flavoured teas are a quick and easy way to add flavour.

Try green tea, which is rich in flavanols, thought to help reduce cholesterol, but remember it still contains some caffeine.

Add 200ml boiling water to the green tea bags and brew for five minutes.

Discard the bags then add the tea to one cup of dried fruit (it should just cover the fruit) and leave overnight, covered in the fridge.

Alternatively, put tea and fruit in a saucepan on a gentle heat and reduce for a more syrupy liquid.

WARM BERRIES

GOOD FOR: YOUR HAIR

INGREDIENTS (for two pancakes):

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION:

Berries have lower sugar content than many other fruits and are rich in antioxidants, such as vitamin C, that may protect against cell damage.

Frozen berries can be a cost-effective, handy way to eat them in the winter.

Gently warm a cupful of mixed frozen berries in a saucepan on low heat or in the microwave.

The pips in fruit such as raspberries will boost the fibre content, so don’t sieve the berries if you are going to puree them.

GUILT-FREE NUT & CHOCOLATE SPREAD

GOOD FOR: YOUR BONES

INGREDIENTS:

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION:

With the news full of reports that we’re eating too much sugar, too much fat and the wrong kind of fat, here is a healthier version of a sugary spread.

Check that the nut butter is 100 per cent nuts (or whiz up your own using skinless, roasted hazelnuts).

Spread your pancake with hazelnut butter, top with a dollop of vanilla yoghurt and grate dark chocolate on top.

Hazelnuts are high in fibre, and dark chocolate is rich in iron and magnesium for bones, teeth and muscle health.

BEEF AND BEETROOT

GOOD FOR: YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE

INGREDIENTS:

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION:

A different take on blinis with smoked salmon: choose thinly sliced, lean beef, a good source of zinc, which is important for healthy skin, hair, nails, eyes and immune system.

Top with sliced beetroot, a rich source of nitrate.The body converts it into nitric oxide, which dilates blood vessels and may help lower blood pressure and boost blood flow.

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4265956/Yes-thing-healthy-pancakes.html