Home » Celebrities » Rules Don’t Apply is curious but compelling 

Rules Don’t Apply is curious but compelling 

 

Howard Hughes, the recluse with a roving eye: Rules Don’t Apply is curious but compelling

Rules don’t apply (12A)

Verdict:  Curious but compelling

Rating:

Warren Beatty’s first film this century (he is the director, writer, producer and star) fortuitously arrives in cinemas at a time when he would doubtless like to be talked about for something other than his unwitting role in screwing up the Oscars.

Rules Don’t Apply does the job nicely. It is set at the turn of the Sixties, with Beatty playing the legendary movie mogul, aviator, inventor, recluse and all-round weirdo Howard Hughes — possibly one of the few men to generate as many Hollywood anecdotes as Beatty himself.

A strong cast includes Beatty’s wife Annette Bening as the strict, ambitious mother of would-be starlet Marla Mabrey (Lily Collins). She arrives in Hollywood from small-town Virginia to do a screen test for the famous Mr Hughes.

A strong cast includes Beatty’s wife Annette Bening as the strict, ambitious mother of would-be starlet Marla Mabrey (Lily Collins)

A strong cast includes Beatty’s wife Annette Bening as the strict, ambitious mother of would-be starlet Marla Mabrey (Lily Collins)

Warren Beatty's film arrives in cinemas at a time when he would doubtless like to be talked about for something other than his unwitting role in screwing up the Oscars

Warren Beatty’s film arrives in cinemas at a time when he would doubtless like to be talked about for something other than his unwitting role in screwing up the Oscars

His office has supplied her with a dishy driver, Frank (Alden Ehrenreich), but their obvious mutual attraction is complicated, partly by Hughes’s insistence that his employees should keep their hands off the talent.

So, to whom will Marla lose her small-town virginity? Suffice to say that there is a distinct whiff of dirty old man about Hughes, when eventually he appears, and one distinctly creepy scene makes it impossible to overlook the yawning age gap — more than half a century — between Beatty and Collins.

Nonetheless, Beatty succeeds in making Hughes appear more sad than seedy, both corrupted and persecuted by his own extreme wealth.

Really, this is Marla and Frank’s story, but neither of them can escape their benefactor’s strange, poisoned aura.

Really, this is Marla and Frank’s story, but neither of them can escape their benefactor’s strange, poisoned aura

Really, this is Marla and Frank’s story, but neither of them can escape their benefactor’s strange, poisoned aura

Rules Don’t Applyis set at the turn of the Sixties, with Beatty playing the legendary movie mogul, aviator, inventor, recluse and all-round weirdo Howard Hughes

Rules Don’t Applyis set at the turn of the Sixties, with Beatty playing the legendary movie mogul, aviator, inventor, recluse and all-round weirdo Howard Hughes

Skeletons in the closet…and a she-devil on her trail

Unforgettable (15)

Verdict: Far from memorable

Rating:

A twisted revenge thriller with echoes of Fatal Attraction, Unforgettable promises more than it eventually delivers, and indeed ends up being the precise opposite of its title. By the time you’ve passed the pick ’n’ mix on your way out of the cinema, you’ll barely remember it.

Rosario Dawson stars as Julia, a woman with a hunky fiancé, David (Geoff Stults), and a chance of a new beginning out west.

Her last relationship ended badly, with domestic violence and a restraining order. But David seems a proper catch. She doesn’t tell him about her violent ex.

Tessa (Katherine Heigl): Most of this is well acted, much is well-scripted, but as Tessa’s vindictiveness builds, the film gets overwrought and plain silly

Tessa (Katherine Heigl): Most of this is well acted, much is well-scripted, but as Tessa’s vindictiveness builds, the film gets overwrought and plain silly

The only hitch, but what a hitch, is that David comes with a daughter and an uptight ex-wife, Tessa (Katherine Heigl), who finds the skeletons in Julia’s closet and plots her downfall.

Most of this is well acted, much is well-scripted, but as Tessa’s vindictiveness builds, the film gets overwrought and plain silly.

By the time Cheryl Ladd wafts into the proceedings as a dolled-up psycho-granny, I could hardly contain my mirth.

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-4431062/Rules-Don-t-Apply-curious-compelling.html

Similar posts